ARA Rivadavia (1911)

Rivadavia running speed trials in 1914. Photo in the collection of the Library of Congress.

Nation
Ship Class
Laid Down
1910
Launched
1911
Commissioned
1914
Decommissioned
1952
AD/BC
AD
History

Rivadavia was the lead ship of the only Argentinian class of dreadnoughts. Laid down in Massachusetts on 25 May, 1910, she was designed to counter the Brazilian Minas Geraes-class. After these were sold to the Ottoman Empire, Argentina tried to sell Rivadavia and her sister Moreno, but political pressure, mainly from the US, convinced them to keep the ships, and Rivadavia commissioned on 27 August, 1914. She spent her first few years showing the flag in ceremonial events, and in the training squadron. She was placed in reserve in late 1922, but she was modernized in Boston from 1924-26. Rivadavia spent the rest of her career cycling between the reserve fleet and semi-active duty, sitting out the Second World War with the rest of Argentina, and making her final cruise in late 1946. Rendered inoperable in 1951, Rivadavia was cannibalized for parts until sold in 1957. She arrived in Italy for scrapping in May, 1959.